U.S. envoy to India warns vs. another Mumbai-style attack

Web Exclusive
May 20, 2011

Text and photo by Ted Regencia

CHICAGO — The outgoing U.S. ambassador to India warned Friday against another terrorist attack in the world’s largest democracy, saying it could spark serious conflict with its neighbor and fellow nuclear state of Pakistan.

Speaking before members of Chicago’s foreign affairs establishment, Timothy J. Roemer said that while “great progress” has been made in terms of counter-terrorism cooperation between India and Pakistan, a single violent event could alter that tenuous relationship.

“If another Mumbai attack takes place in India, if we are not able to work with India to deflect that attack, it very well could lead to increased tensions and possibly some kind of exchange between these two nuclear nations,” Roemer said.

Continue reading “U.S. envoy to India warns vs. another Mumbai-style attack”

World to End on May 21? Skeptics Not Buying It

AOL-Patch.com
May 20, 2011

By Ted Regencia

SKOKIE, Ill — If faithful listeners of the Christian broadcasting network Family Radio are to be believed, then the organizers of the Skokie Festival of Cultures picked the wrong date to kickstart the festivities on Saturday.

On that day, May 21, 2011, the world will come to an end, according to the Christian group Project Caravan, which has been crisscrossing the U.S., including the Chicago area, to spread its message. It is a claim widely received with skepticism if not outright dismissal from other religious and scientific communities.

“The end of the world is almost here,” Project Caravan proclaims on its radio station, its billboards, its leaflets and its website. “The bible guarantees it.”

Five months of natural disaster will commence on May 21, and earthquakes will cause widespread death among nonbelievers, while the believers will be saved from damnation and punishment.

To read the full story, please visit AOL-Patch.com

Emanuel sworn as new Chicago mayor

Xinhua English
May 16, 2011

Text and photo by Ted Regencia

CHICAGO — Declaring that Chicago “is ready for change” and vowing to address major problems such as school reform, street violence and a large budget deficit in city government, Rahm Emanuel took his oath as Chicago mayor on Monday before a large crowd that includes U.S. Vice President Joe Biden.

“Today, more than any other time in our history, more than any other place in our country, the city of Chicago is ready for change,” said Emanuel amid cheers from thousands and supporters and hundreds of flag-waving schoolchildren.

Emanuel succeeds Richard M. Daley, the longest-serving mayor of the city for 22 years, and will inherit from him a modern metropolis, dubbed as one of the greenest cities in the world, but which also faces lingering racial segregation, high unemployment and a $654 million budget shortage. He served as President Obama’s chief of staff before returning to city to run for mayor.

Continue reading “Emanuel sworn as new Chicago mayor”

Chicago universities see language as U.S. bridge to China

Xinhua English
May 15, 2011

By Ted Regencia

CHICAGO — Amid the lingering misunderstanding between the world’s largest economies of the U.S. and China, two language professors from top Chicago universities said understanding Chinese is crucial to improving trans-national relationship.

“Chinese language is really a conduit. Actually it can serve as a bridge. Through learning Chinese, my American students can gradually get to know about China, about the Chinese people,” said Prof. Licheng Gu of Northwestern University.

“They (American students) have a lot of misunderstanding about China. But while learning Chinese, they have to know about the Chinese culture. So my Chinese language teachers explain to the students what the real China is,” he said. Continue reading “Chicago universities see language as U.S. bridge to China”

Chicken coop idea may not fly in Skokie

AOL-Patch.com
May 15, 2011

Text and photo by Ted Regencia

SKOKIE, Ill — It was a question that even Skokie Mayor George Van Dusen conceded he could not quite find the right words to answer.

At a forum sponsored by the community organization Skokie Voice last February, Dennis Clarke asked if the village would allow him to raise chickens in his backyard.

As Clarke stood waiting for the mayor’s answer, audible laughter was heard among the crowd of about 200 people gathered at the Oakton Community Center.

Mayor Van Dusen was visibly surprised at the question, acknowledging to Clarke that it was first time he had been confronted with such a query. He said the village currently prohibits residents from raising livestock including chickens.

To read the full story, please visit AOL-Patch.com

Largest U.S. film studio outside Hollywood opens in Chicago

Xinhua English
May 11, 2011

Text and photo by Ted Regencia

CHICAGO, May 10 (Xinhua) — What do “Batman: The Dark Night,” and the upcoming movies “Transformers 3” and “Superman: Man of Steel” have in common? They all have Chicago as a filming location.

On Tuesday, Chicago was touted anew as “a world class film destination” with the opening of a state-of-the-art film and television studio, said to be the largest facility in the United States outside Hollywood.

Joined by Emmy Award-winning actor Kelsey Grammer and the producers of the new Chicago-inspired TV series “Boss,” Illinois Governor Pat Quinn announced that the state is investing five million U.S. dollars into the new privately-owned Cinespace Chicago Film Studios.

To read the full story, please visit Xinhua English

Thousands gather to celebrate Chicago’s Polish heritage

Xinhua English
May 08, 2011

Text and photo by Ted Regencia

CHICAGO — A sea of red and white dominated Chicago’s Grant Park Saturday as the city’s large Polish American population celebrated Polish Constitution Day, attracting thousands of participants, spectators and top politicians.

Retiring Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and U.S. Senator Mark Kirk marched alongside other elected officials and leaders of the Polish community in a festive parade, which first started in the Humboldt Park neighborhood 120 years ago.

“The city has been founded by immigrants and that’s the strength of this great city,” Daley said in paying tribute to the Polish immigrant community who first settled in Chicago starting in 1837.

To read the full story, please visit Xinhua English